Book Review – Clockwork

Hello all, so as many of you know I read a good bit, and I also like to use “audible”. Great way to pass time while traveling or driving is to listen to audio books. Right now I’ve been on a real kick to learn more about business perspective and productivity. Some of the great books I’ve read and talked about before are:

  • Grit
  • Essentialism
  • 10x Rule
  • Deep Work

But I wanted to take a minute to talk about the book I just finished, Clockwork: Designing your business to run itself, by Mike Michalowicz. Now I have to admit, I found out about this book when I heard about it a couple of times and it showed up on my “recommended reading” books a few times.

So I was skeptical about this book, mainly because the book talks about how its focused on people starting their own business, and I work for a major corporation. So how can this be helpful to me? Well I have to admit, I was wrong.

I found this book to be really thought provoking, and it caused me to re-examine a lot of activities and work I do to measure impact and importance to success. The author makes the argument that in any organization, everyone has a responsibility to do the following:

  1. Protect the Queen Bee Role
  2. Serve the Queen Bee Role

And basically the key part of the business is to take the QBR (the Queen Bee Role) which is the crucial part of your job, and make all of your actions that you take focus on that above all others. Basically the argument is that I should spend every second of my work day focusing on that QBR, and when an activity takes away from that, I should focus on getting done with that as soon as possible, or if possible moving it off my plate.

The intention is that it makes me focus on the bigger picture and creates a scenario where you can take off from work and feel comfortable. For me, I have a tendency to have a hard time unplugging, and stepping away from work. And recently I’ve been setting goals to help myself to unplug. I found that when I started to put this into practice, I was able to unplug with less stress and it helped my overall mental health. For me, I started with the intention of doing the following:

  • Blocking 1 hour for lunch everyday
  • I will not eat at my desk

This forces me to take a lunch break away from my desk, and honestly it sounds small but it has paid huge returns, I have found that when I come back to work I am more focused, and at the end of the day less drained from a mental perspective. I find that stress level has gone down with regard to work and I also find that the work I’m doing is much more satisfying.

Below is a video that summarizes some of the ideas of the book. The value of this book though aren’t the ideas, but how you execute.

Starting out with Data Science, where to go from here

Data Science, let’s get started!

You can’t turn around anymore without hearing people talk about data. It’s everywhere, and honestly its only growing more. Here are a couple of statistics I found interesting (all from Forbes). The big one being for me, 79% of enterprise executives agree that companies that do not embrace Big Data will lose their competitive position and could face extinction.

Let’s stop and think about that a minute, AI is all over the news, and people are constantly figuring out new ways to leverage data to encourage new innovations. It really is quite the time to be alive!

So that being said, I’ve decided to start to shift my focus and learn more about this field and how to leverage it for the future. And I know there are a lot of other people out there in the same boat as me, so I figured I’d start documenting it all here and help those looking for resources with some of the ones I’ve found.

So where to start, I started with a link to this course track:

Data Science Track from Microsoft Academy:
This takes a bunch of courses on EdX and puts them into a nice track and I find that this is a good 100 level entry to Data Science, AI and Analytics. I’m halfway through now, and working through the content and have found it helpful.

All Posts

Getting Started

So I thought I would start this new direction for the blog with a post about a topic I get asked about a lot.

“I want to get started in programming, how do I do that?”

And this is a great question, and one that makes a lot of sense to me as the lines between technology and business are blurring.  And more and more people are interacting with developers in their daily life as part of their current jobs, and its leading to people’s eyes being opened to the opportunities in this place.

My next question is normally “Why?” and at first that usually takes people back, but this is an important thing to ask yourself.  I ask this because to be honest, switching fields and taking on something like becoming a developer isn’t an easy journey, and if your motives aren’t clear than your going to set yourself up for failure.  I generally think it’s smart to ask if this is a worthwhile investment of your time.  Because as much as I love this industry, it can be quite brutal at times.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not making these statements as some grand arbiter who decides if you are worthy of becoming an almighty developer.  I make these statements because the simple truth is that to work as a developer and achieve success you need to be willing to accept the reality, which is less Minority Report and steve jobs, and more the craziness of Silicon Valley.

I would tell you to ask the following questions:

  • Do you like continual education?  Are you willing to read about this stuff in your spare time?
  • Do you like to tinker with things?
  • Do you have “Grit”?

For the final question, specifically I’m referring to the fantastic book by Angela Duckworth, that describes Grit as basically being the intersection of Passion and Perseverance, and that it is the most important part of any equation where someone is hoping for success.  And I would argue, even more so true for developers.

If you look online at the “successful developers” they all have one thing in common…they live for this stuff.  And spend a lot of time doing it, and finding new ways to challenge themselves and push boundaries.  They are constantly looking for ways to change their mindset to find new opportunities and directions.  I don’t claim to be a famous developer, but I can tell you that I’m proud of where I’ve gone in my career and I genuinely love what I do, and much like those “famous developers”, my wife describes me as a “well documented nerd”.

So now the important question is, did I lose you?  If not, I think this is a rewarding career option that can take you in some interesting directions, but you need to know that it will be a slow burn.  This is not something where you will be writing award winning apps by Monday if you start on Friday.

Below are some links to help you out, feel free to reach out with questions, I’ve tried to provide a lot of training material and some notes about each link:

Visual Studio 2017 Community Edition – This is the primary IDE (integrated developer environment) for all things in the Micr0soft stack. And the community edition is free, which is even better.

https://www.visualstudio.com/downloads/

When you go to install it, its going to ask you to customize the install, by selecting different packages and what not.

Great start: C# fundamentals for Absolute Beginners:

https://mva.microsoft.com/en-US/training-courses/16169?l=Lvld4EQIC_2706218949

For training materials I would recommend the following:

Microsoft Virtual Academy – https://mva.microsoft.com/

This is a great site for a lot of training content Microsoft generates to help. I would point you to the absolute beginner classes as well as the learning paths. They also do a good job of categorizing training (100 level, 200 level etc)

C# Courses:

https://mva.microsoft.com/training-topics/c-app-development#!jobf=Developer&lang=1033

Visual Studio Training:

https://mva.microsoft.com/product-training/visual-studio-courses#!jobf=Developer&lang=1033

Getting started with Visual Studio 2017

https://mva.microsoft.com/en-US/training-courses/getting-started-with-visual-studio-2017-17798?l=9oIw0FD6D_3611787171

Learning Paths:

https://mva.microsoft.com/LearningPaths.aspx

Channel 9 – https://channel9.msdn.com/

Great site for general videos, and is updated all the time.

I recommend web as a good place to start, the .net web platform is called ASP.NET and uses HTML, C#, and some javascript to work. (C# and Javascript syntax are pretty close)

https://www.asp.net/get-started

https://www.asp.net/mvc/overview/getting-started

This is probably a good start.