How to punch up your resume?

So I thought given the new direction with this blog, I would focus my attention on some of the questions I get a lot.  And one of the  biggest questions I get asked frequently is “My resume is terrible, how do I make it better?”

To be perfectly honest, most people undervalue their resume, and think of it like some kind of checkbox.  I love hearing people say “I’m not worried, once I go in for the interview the resume is meaningless.”  To which my response is HOW DO YOU THINK YOU GET THE INTERVIEW!

There’s an old adage, that the you never get a second chance to make a first impression, and when applying for jobs, the resume is your first impression.  When I worked for a prior company, part of my job was interviewing new talent and determining if they were a good fit to move the organization forward.  As such, I literally conducted over 100 interviews in a 8 month a period.  I can say I’ve seen a lot of things, and this blog post is really based around the tips that would apply to help get your resume noticed and get you in the interview.

  1. DO NOT stick to one page:  In college they will tell you that your resume must be limited to one page.  That is not realistic for a technical position, because in these positions we are looking for the skills you have.  Don’t go crazy but a good three page resume is a lot better than Times New Roman, size 8 compressed onto a page.  The human eye needs white space more than anything.
  2. Keep it up to date:  This is jumping a little further ahead, but make sure it is 100% current.  I’ve read resumes of people and nothing turns the interviewer off more than to bring you in and here, “Here’s the stuff that I’ve been working on”.
  3. Describe the projects:  Even better than a list of skills is a project description, and acknowledging that you can’t give up all details.  But things like, “Project XYZ was a mobile app built with Xamarin with a Cosmos DB database back end, and I was the lead developer of the mobile side.” tells me a lot about what your skills are.
  4. Be clear about your role:  It helps if you tell me what you did on the project, and be clear about the responsibility not the titles.  I’ll give an example, my first job I was responsible for building software for managing test centers and grading certification exams with the state, but being the state my job title was “LAN Technican”, no even close.  So I found that you should try to change your title, just list what you did on the project.  It gives a clearer picture of what your skills are.
  5. Put in personal projects:  I used to tell people “I can teach someone to code the way I want, but I can’t teach passion”.  So if you’ve contributed to GitHub projects, put it in there, if you have apps in the app store, put them in there.  Talk to me about what you with, that shows perseverance and drive, which I can’t teach.  If you blog list that, if you work with user groups, put that.  I once had a candidate show “my son and I built a cloud enabled race car with a raspberry pi and a cell phone”, that’s fantastic information.  But make sure you limit it to what you’ve done.
  6. Be Honest about how much you’ve worked with something:  It’s a great idea to quantify your technical skills, you can use a 1-10 scale, or some other measure, on my resume I use a 1-5 scale.  This allows them to get a good assessment of your skills and saves everyone time.  And to be honest this is another one where you show “I’m learning Xamarin on my own” is huge.  Expect that during the technical interview you are going to be grilled on all these, and if you aren’t honest, that’s a guaranteed out (next post we talk about the technical interview).

 

Welcome to Mack Bytes

Hello all, consider this the inaugural post of the new Mack Bytes blog.  Welcome!  I’ve chosen to sort of rebrand this blog, and sort of relaunch it for a couple of reasons.  The first and foremost of which is that the other blog has sort of faded.

To be honest I started that blob it feels like a life-time ago, and it was started with the intention of creating a blog to provide articles that were intended to be “how-to” guides, and other targeted posts strictly only on software development.  And there’s nothing wrong with that, but if I’m being honest, I had trouble continually updating it, and it felt like every post started with “Let me start by apologizing for the lack of updates”.  And that’s not a good place to be.  I also feel like my life has changed actually quite a bit recently, and I sort of wanted to refocus my efforts.  So over the past year I’ve been doing a lot of thinking, and planning.  And this has all been geared around life goals and direction.  And I really wanted to relaunch this blog with the intention of being more than it was before.  Don’t get me wrong I’m a big nerd at heart, so there will always be the technical posts, but this newly branded blog is more about changing to being a general blog to help people as I figure this stuff out for myself.

In essence, I’m inviting you all on my journey.  So I’ve found myself at the tender age of 35, and realized that the journey that got me to where I am is very different from the plan when I graduated college, and I’m looking forward to where I can go next.  But really for me to do that, a lot of factors have to be considered.  And a lot will likely happen along the way.  I will be using this blog as a platform to help people and share insights.  And I will also be leveraging other social media platforms as a way of driving those messages.  So if you like what you see here, please pass it along to someone else, if you don’t please talk to me.  I’d love to start a dialog exchange if you disagree with my thoughts, actions, or beliefs.  Dialog is the best way to really grow, and challenging dialog has a way of making you re-examine your beliefs and actions.

So here we go, the first post of the new blog, looking forward to more.